Suspension Saga continued (finally)

After patiently waiting for my brother’s arrival with the much-needed Torx bits… I continued where I left off. With the Torx bits, I managed to get the bottom of the hub carrier off… and it was at that point I hit another wall. I was supposed to remove the top mount but needed an angled spanner to get in and loosen the nut… something which I didn’t have at hand. I hit up another friend who I recently learned was also working on a car at home and needed to wait another day for the tool. My patience has become well practised at this point… another day was considered a cake walk.

Something that I hadn’t considered was the age of the parts in question and how difficult they would be to remove…. and I’m almost positive that in the 16 years of this car’s existence, it had never had the suspension struts changed. The metal connections were now like a happily married couple… it was going to take unmerciful and relentless force to separate them. And that force was to come from a rubber mallet with assistance from some WD40 to help loosen it. I made countless hits in an effort to remove the strut… it seemed to take hours! And right when I was about to submit, the first strut finally came loose. Angels were singing in a delightful harmony (in my mind) as I held the assembly high over my head like the trophy it now was. By the time this happened, the sun was going down and I would need to continue on the next day. At least I was able to rest with a minor victory in mind.

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The Trophy Strut

Once the day started up, I got back into preparing the strut. The first thing that needed to get done was transferring the support bracket from the old strut to the new. The support bracket is a piece of plastic that’s task is to hold the brake line in place… kind of important. I found a Torx bit that had a hollowed out centre to place over the pin holding the bracket in place, and with a couple of hits with a hammer it popped out and was then placed onto the new strut.

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In preparation for changing the struts, I ordered a spring compression tool off eBay well in advance. The tool is necessary to relieve the tension of the springs so you are able to remove the strut. Once that was done, the old strut was swapped with the new one and then I worked in reverse to put it all back together.

 

 

If I thought it was rough getting the strut out in the first place, getting it back into the hub carrier was just as harrowing of an experience…. requiring countless mallet hits and curse words.

 

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The strut finally as it should be

With the strut now in place…. I realised I was only halfway done. Being able to learn from the difficulties of the first strut, the second strut was replaced with a little more ease… but not much more. The service manual advised having an axle stand holding the driveshaft so it wouldn’t accidentally get overextended causing more damage… and this is something that I was sure to have in place. But while working on strut number 2, something I didn’t expect happened. The driveshaft came right off exposing what looked like the transmission.

 

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My immediate reaction

 

In a quick response to this, I managed to pop the driveshaft back into place and everything seems to be fine. The main problem with this was that the CV boot was now loose and would need to be retightened…. with a tool I don’t have in my possession. It’s something that I will have to deal with down the track, but it is fine for now since it’s not leaking any grease.

 

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Loose CV Boot

The whole process of DIY for me can be frustrating, but always enlightening as I’m not only learning how to get these things done, but also the processes that will help me improve in the future. And I definitely need to get a Torque wrench if I’m to do any future work on the car… it’s already been ordered.

 

 

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